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Mistaken Perceptions 3 – Yahweh’s Name Is Not “The LORD”

November 19, 2015

Exodus 20:7 – “You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain . . .”
In November of 2014 we looked at the mistaken perception that Yahweh is so holy that he cannot be anywhere that sin or evil exists – that he cannot confront sin or evil in person. In January of 2015 we looked at the mistaken perception that when scripture uses the name Yahweh it always and only means God the Father. Now, in December of 2015 we will look at the mistaken perception that when scripture uses the capitalized term, LORD, it is the name of Yahweh.

The LORD Is Not My Name
The name, Yahweh, has been edited out of most modern translations. Scripture uses the Hebrew word YHVH [יַהְוֶה H3068] in 5,911 verses in the King James, 5,897 verses in the NASB, and in all of those instances it is translated into the English term: The LORD. The English word Lord, however, is better translated by the Hebrew word Adonai [אֲדֹנָי H136] or the Greek word Kyrios [κύριος G2962]. It is only Jewish tradition that Yahweh’s name is too sacred to pronounce, so every time the original Hebrew uses the term YHVH, they substitute the word, Adonai. By doing so, they believe that they are obeying the command to not take the Lord’s name in vain (Exodus 20:7).

In My Name
LORD, and even GOD, are titles, not names! Yahweh does not command anyone to declare his titles, but he does expect all to declare his name. In the Older Covenant prophecies are spoken in the name of Yahweh, blessings are given in the name of Yahweh, prayers are offered in the name of Yahweh, and trust is placed in the name of Yahweh. In the Newer Covenant, Yeshua tells us to do all of these things in his name! Again, we see the same words applied to both Yahweh and Yeshua, for Yahweh and Yeshua are one. (See Deuteronomy 18:20, Ezra 5:1, 1 Chronicles 16:2b, Psalm 118:26, Psalm 129:8, Zephaniah 3:12, John 14:13, James 5:14, etc.).

My Name is Yahweh
The four letter representation God’s name, commonly called the Tetragrammaton, is composed of four Hebrew letters: Yod, Hey, Vav, Hey [YHVH – יהוה], meaning: the self existent one; also the proper name of the God of Israel.

In My Name
In Ancient Hebrew, every letter has meaning which is displayed pictorially by a symbol:
Yod יַ
Yod is portrayed by the symbol of an entire hand, from the wrist to the fingertips.
It signifies the nailing at the wrist of Yeshua’s hands on the cross.
Hey ה
Hey is portrayed by the symbol of a man with arms raised.
It signifiesthe outstretched arms of Yeshua on the cross.
Vav ו
Vav is portrayed by the symbol of a nail, peg or hook.
It signifies the nailed hands and feet of Yeshua on the cross.

The four letters: Yod, Hey, Vav, Hey [יהוה] can be translated to mean:
• The Man With The Outstretched Arms and Nailed Hands Shall Be Revealed Twice.
• Behold the Nail, Behold the Hand.
• Behold the Nailed Hand.

The overall meaning of the word, YHWH is: salvation! Therefore, the four letters can also be translated to mean:
• Behold – The Nailed Hand Is Salvation.

Conclusions
Isaiah 43:11 – “I, I am Yahweh, and there is no other Savior but me . . .”
Many (if not most) translations have edited out the name of Yahweh, replacing it with the term the LORD. Doing so gives the mistaken perception that when scripture uses the capitalized term, the LORD, it is the name of Yahweh, not a title, but just the opposite is true. Doing so directly disobeys Yahweh’s explicit command to declare his name to all peoples in the world.  Doing so virtually eliminates the message that Yahweh is the only name in which we have salvation.

Mistaken Perceptions Series
November 20, 2014 – Mistaken Perceptions 1
January 15, 2015 – Mistaken Perceptions 2
November 17, 2016 – Mistaken Perceptions 4

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